Ukraine

SEEDIG 2019 Is Coming to Bucharest. Join Now, Not to Regret Afterwards…

We are thrilled to announce that this year South Eastern European Dialogue on Internet Governance (SEEDIG) is coming to Bucharest, Romania, on May 7-8, 2019.

Why should you join SEEDIG in Bucharest? It’s simple:

  • We are the only sub-regional initiative dedicated to open, inclusive, and informal dialogue on Internet policy and governance
  • We specifically focus on South Eastern Europe and neighbouring area (SEE+)
  • We are an amazing community of like-minded people passionate about Internet and its governing policies
  • We unite people coming from various backgrounds and all stakeholder groups (governments, private sector, technical community, academia, civil society)
  • We discuss topics relevant for the SEE+ region, such as digital divide, cybersecurity, IDNs, digital rights, and digital economy
  • We want our region to use its human and technological potential to the fullest, and have an equal stand in Internet governance ecosystem.

This year’s programme is still being shaped by the programme committee, and you have all the chances to be a part of the agenda. In May at SEEDIG we will talk about:

  • Cybersecurity and building trust in digital technologies
  • Internet infrastructure and using technologies for digital innovation
  • Digital technologies for all by enhancing accessibility and skills
  • Trends, challenges and regulations in digital businesses.

You can follow the agenda drafting process, and check the programme for regular updates by visiting SEEDIG official website.

If you are passionate about asking thought-provoking questions and know how to peacefully and productively manage a discussion between stakeholders with opposite interests, write to us, and we can discuss about your potential role as a moderator.

If, otherwise, you feel more like sharing your own experiences and expertise, drop us a line, and we will gladly talk about your contribution to the discussions.

If you want to make sure that none of the key messages discussed during the sessions gets lost, we have a role for you. Join us as a rapporteur, take notes of the discussions, and share them afterwards with the community for a follow-up and further collaboration in-between the annual meetings. We are waiting for your expressions of interest.

Want to support us financially and increase your visibility in the region? After you check our sponsorship proposal, send us a notification, and we will contact you to discuss details, and will feature your name among our partners (ICANN, ISOC, RIPE NCC, Council of Europe, European Commission, EuroDIG, etc.).

Have you heard about SEEDIG before but never had a chance to attend? Or is it the very first time that you come across this abbreviation? We are open to both experienced participants and absolute newcomers. Participation in the SEEDIG 5 meeting is totally free and inclusive, but registration is required. Register now, and become a part of the biggest Internet governance event in the region.

We are preparing one more surprise for you to celebrate SEEDIG’s 5th anniversary. If you are not yet a part of the community, or haven’t been active so far, it’s the right time to join, and unite efforts to shape a better digital future for our region.

You are the one we need in the community of Internet governance enthusiasts. Let’s meet in Bucharest this May!

New Comparative Analysis on Internet Blocking: Focus on Ukraine, Russia, and Turkey

The world we live in gave us global Internet, universal right to freedom of expression, but also selective application of national laws to online space. When starting the analysis a few questions were set out as a reference point: Is modern Internet still the same as it was constructed by its founders? How much discretion should the governments enjoy when deciding on the limitations of Internet freedom? These and many other collateral questions are subject of heated discussions at all international forums related to Internet governance and human rights. And while answers are not there, Internet freedom is in danger for many years in a row. If proper actions won’t be taken by international community, we may witness even worse decline of freedom of expression in the upcoming years, and very likely in the countries that gave no alarm signals before. There is also a common misbelief that blocking is something possible and feasible in technologically advanced countries. We decided to check whether technological sophistication and censoring policies always go hand in hand, using the examples of Ukraine, Russia, and Turkey.

The comparative analysis consistently unveils legal framework for Internet freedom, specifics of Internet blocking, statistics naming the most hostile governments, results of Internet freedom survey in Ukraine, as well as restrictive practices implemented in the region by Ukraine, Russia, and Turkey. It concludes with a number of recommendations addressed to the governments in order to ensure proper respect and protection for Internet freedom. 

Text is available in English and Ukrainian

The comparative analysis “Internet Blocking: Fragmenting Network & Violating Freedoms” was prepared by a non-governmental organisation “Digital Defenders Partners” (DDP) within the framework of the project “Securitization of Internet Freedom” implemented under the support of the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative (ABA ROLI).

IFEX’s Faces of Free Expression from Eastern and Central Europe and Eurasia

IFEX, a global network of independent non-governmental organizations working to defend and promote freedom of expression as a fundamental human right, published “The Faces of Free Expression” – 102 profiles of human rights defenders from around the world, drawing attention to their struggles. 16 of them are from the region of Eastern and Central Europe and Eurasia.

(more…)

In Ukraine, Fears of ‘Technological Terrorism’ Cause Free Expression to Decline

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Open air exhibition of posters of different kinds of soldiers from Ukrainian history next to landmark St. Andrew Church in Kiev. Photo by Filip Stojanovski, CC BY.

State of Internet freedom in Ukraine is a reflection of challenges brought to free speech and independent reporting under the conflict settings, explains legal expert Olga Kyryliuk. (more…)

Legitimizing Internet Blocking in Ukraine: To Be or Not To Be?

Photo by James Sutton on Unsplash

Photo by James Sutton on Unsplash

In July 2017, right before taking a summer break, the Parliament of Ukraine has registered two controversial draft laws allegedly aimed at countering threats to national security in information sphere. The bills 6676 and 6688 are almost identical, with the second one having been registered the next day after the first one was recalled from the Parliament. There were also two new authors added. (more…)